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Famous Interior Designers and Their Styles in Interior Design – Part 1

Introduction

This series of 4 articles takes a brief but informative look at 21 of the most famous and Interior Designers, from the earliest pioneers right through to the most celebrated modern day designers.

The Pioneers of Interior Design

Jean-Henri Jansen (1854-1928)

Dutch designer, Jean-Henri Jansen, launched one of the first ever international interior design companies ‘Maison Jansen’ (House of Jansen) in 1880, which became renowned for designing and creating exceptionally beautiful and high quality furniture which would be utilized in a multitude of interior decoration projects. House of Jansen opened branches in 8 of the major cities of the world. Jansen worked closely with the talented interior designer Stephane Boudin whom he made director of the company. The clients of House of Jansen included Royalty and the rich and famous.

Elsie de Wolfe (1865-1950)

The first lady of interior decoration, Elsie de Wolfe considered herself an ‘ugly child’. This Victorian stage actress was a rebel of her times and was credited by many to be the inventor of the modern profession of interior design, even though there were already established interior designers in her time. Elsie disliked Victorian tastes altogether, her designs were therefore generally made up of light and bright colors, contrary to the drab and gloomy Victorian décor coupled with unnecessary excesses such as heavy velvet draperies. This was a pioneering departure from the contemporary designs of the time. Elsie’s influence continues to be felt in the modern world of interior design.

Ogden Codman (1863-1951)

American interior decorator and architect, Ogden Codman spent his childhood in his birthplace of Boston before heading to France in his youth for a period of time. Codman had two uncles who influenced him tremendously – architect John Hubbard and decorator Richard Ogden. Some of Ogden Codman’s works include Edith Wharton’s Newport home, Land’s End, the Rockefeller family estate of New York client John D. Rockefeller, Jr. and the Newport summer home of Cornelius Vanderbilt II. Along with novelist Edith Wharton, Codman co-authored a guidepost of American interior design, ‘The Decoration of Houses’ in 1897.

Frances Elkins (1888-1953)

Born in Milwaukee, Frances Adler Elkins was one of the most prominent interior decorator and designer of the previous century. Sister of the famed Chicago architect David Adler, Elkins was known for her futuristic designs that brought together different styles and elements from various periods. They included country French styles, chinoiserie and art deco. The furnishings featured in her designs included designers such as Jean-Michel Frank and Alberto Giacometti. The career of Elkins that spanned over three decades is glittered with many high profile commissions in Hawaii, the Midwest and northern and southern California, none more interesting than the restoration of the 1830s structure, Casa Amesti in Monterrey, California.

Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959)

Frank Lloyd Wright was an interior designer and architect whose career included more than 1000 projects, 500 of them that have been complete. Wright was known for his promotion of organic architecture, an example of which is Fallingwater. The Robie House is an example of Wright’s leadership of the Prairie School architectural movement, while the Rosenbaum House depicts Wright’s Usonian home concept. Wright also had refreshing ideas for every kind of building, be it church, office, school, hotel or museum. Along with excellent architectural renderings, Wright also designed much of the interiors of his buildings including the Décor, layout and furniture.

Interior Design Tips: From Sheepskin Rugs to Modern Lighting

When revamping your home and interior design, there are certain elements that are very important. You don’t have to spend a lot of money either; vintage furniture can look even better than new chairs and dressers, and subtle accents and details can do a lot for the overall image of a room. Read on to learn more.

Let’s start from the bottom up. Any nice home has a rug to tie different design elements together. If you are going for a more contemporary styling, consider sheepskin rugs. If it’s a bedroom, a sheepskin rug thrown over the foot of your bed can also add a certain panache and coziness that you’d otherwise lack. If you’re shooting for a more traditional design, you may prefer an Oriental design as a room’s underpinning. Remember that a rug looks good on top of a wooden floor or a taupe colored carpet. Once you choose a rug around which to build your room, you can start buying accessories.

Think about textures. You want variation, so if you have wood, think velvet and other warm fabrics. If you have steel, adding glass is a good idea. Drapes over curtains, or finer fabric such as silk, satin or lace blow easily in a breeze, allowing a more organic feel into your home. Another organic element every room should have is a plant. Broad shiny leafs, or thin, sharp prickly ones change the feeling of a room from tropical to desert-like. Vibrant greens add to decor and act as an air purifier, preventing rooms from feeling stuffy.

Lighting is also important. Buying lamps to create shadows adds a sense of coziness to any room. Place them on end tables, or if they’re floor lamps, behind large pieces of furniture. Your room should never be dark – that’s the first reason someone would want to spend time somewhere else.

Then think about decorating the walls with art. The art you choose doesn’t have to coincide with a room’s interior design. For example, hanging a Rembrandt print across from a low black modern chair is a lot like having velvet pincushions on your leather couch – it adds to an eclectic mix. But if you want to reinforce a specific tendency, minimalism, for example, you may do well to have an Ellsworth Kelly or a Rothko print instead.

When you walk into a room, you want to feel like it’s made for you, to sit and talk in it. By incorporating these different design elements into your room, you will.

Why Interior Design is Essential For Your Home Improvement?